❮Ebook❯ ➬ دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān] ➭ Author Hafez – Transportjobsite.co.uk

دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān] summary دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān], series دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān], book دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān], pdf دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān], دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān] 6c4b026be4


10 thoughts on “دیوان‎‎ [Dīvān]

  1. says:

    The Divan, Hafez Khw ja Shams ud D n Mu ammad fe e Sh r z , known by his pen name Hafez fe the memorizer the safe keeper 1315 1390 , was a Persian poet who lauded the joys of love and wine but also targeted religious hypocrisy His collected works are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature and are often found in the homes of people in the Persian speaking world, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings His life and poems have been the subject of much analysis, commentary and interpretation, influencing post 14th century Persian writing than any other author 1971 20 .


  2. says:

    The Divan, Hafez, Hushang Ebtehaj 1994 1372 484 4 5 10 16 51 1372 73 78 81 564 567 580 583 593 597 606 609 624 627 639 643 696 699 701 705 716


  3. says:

    The Divan Haf z Divan 1 , Hafez 1971 1982


  4. says:

    The Divan, Hafez Khw ja Shams ud D n Mu ammad fe e Sh r z , known by his pen name Hafez fe the memorizer the safe keeper , was a Persian poet who lauded the joys of love and wine but also targeted religious hypocrisy His collected works are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature and are often found in the homes of people in the Persian speaking world, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings His life and poems have been the subject of much analysis, commentary and interpretation, influencing post 14th century Persian writing than any other author 1971 167 487 26


  5. says:

    Hafez of Ahmad Shamloo, Hafez, Ahmad Shamloo 1971 1300 1372 1280 1360 22 30 15 1000 21 1299 48


  6. says:

    D v n, Hafez Khw ja Shams ud D n Mu ammad fe e Sh r z , known by his pen name Hafez fe the memorizer the safe keeper , was a Persian poet His collected works are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature and are often found in the homes of people in the Persian speaking world, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings His life and poems have been the subject of much analysis, commentary and interpretation, influencing post 14th century Persian writing than any other author 1971 1310 298 1318 396 8 14 400 1368 1359 17 400 .


  7. says:

    The Poems of Hafez , HafezKhw ja Shams ud D n Mu ammad fe e Sh r z , known by his pen name Hafez fe the memorizer the safe keeper , was a Persian poet who lauded the joys of love and wine but also targeted religious hypocrisy His collected works are regarded as a pinnacle of Persian literature and are often found in the homes of people in the Persian speaking world, who learn his poems by heart and still use them as proverbs and sayings His life and poems have been the subject of much analysis, commentary and interpretation, influencing post 14th century Persian writing than any other author.XLIITRUE love has vanished from every heart What has befallen all lovers fair When did the bonds of friendship part What has befallen the friends that were Ah, why are the feet of Khizr lingering The waters of life are no longer clear,The purple rose has turned pale with fear,And what has befallen the wind of Spring None now sayeth A love was mine,Loyal and wise, to dispel my care None remembers love s right divine What has befallen all lovers fair In the midst of the field, to the players feet,The ball of God s favour and mercy came,But none has leapt forth to renew the game What has befallen the horsemen fleet Roses have bloomed, yet no bird rejoiced,No vibrating throat has rung with the tale What can have silenced the hundred voiced What has befallen the nightingale Heaven s music is hushed, and the planets rollIn silence has Zohra broken her lute There is none to press out the vine s ripe fruit,And what has befallen the foaming bowl A city where kings are but lovers crowned,A land from the dust of which friendship springs Who has laid waste that enchanted ground What has befallen the city of kings Years have passed since a ruby was wonFrom the mine of manhood they labour in vain,The fleet footed wind and the quickening rain,And what has befallen the light of the sun Hafiz, the secret of God s dread taskNo man knoweth, in youth or primeOr in wisest age of whom would st thou ask What has befallen the wheels of Time 1971 .


  8. says:

    The Poems Hafiz Written By The Calligrapher Mir Emad 1600 AD, Hafez 2007 1600 1009 961 932 1024 993 1009 979 503 512


  9. says:

    Hafiz a quarry of imagery in which poets of all ages might mine Ralph Waldo EmersonShams Ud Din Muhammad or Hafiz is said to be an almost exact contemporary of Chaucer The pen name Hafiz means one who can recite the Koran by heart Not much else is known about Hafiz The poems from The Divan or Collected Works of Hafiz is in fact or less all we know of his life, where we learn that Hafiz received his gift of poetry from a Gypsy mystic scholar who appears only once in a while to mortals.BackgroundHafiz lived in what was called the times of troubles of the Persian civilization, just before the establishment of the Timurid Dynasty, again forcing us to draw parallels with Chaucer.Before entering the poetry of Hafiz, we need to understand the world that produced it Hafiz was a Shi ite Shi ism was than just a quarrel of succession for these conquered Persians it was the religion of the non Arab oppressed who found in the dispossessed Ali and his sons symbols for suffering and martyrdom It was also an outlet for the mystical and religious longings of this ancient civilization, expressed through the cracks of a much rigorous new religion which forbids much of the Dionysian aspects of Persian culture as well as their ecstatic connection with the mystical.Without keeping in mind the two major currents of religious influence in Persia at the time Shi ism and Sufism font of much of the lyric poetry of the time , Hafiz cannot be fully appreciated The suffering and pathos of early Shi ism and the pantheism and the life celebration of Sufism comes together in Hafiz to form an exhilarating yet humanizing mix that has given it such grandeur and such an endearing personal quality, allowing it to transcend time and still touch our hearts.So the Sufist deification or re deification of wine and of the wine keeper as well as the Madhushala and the neo Platonian conception of the divine as Absolute Beauty all meld together in Hafiz s poetry to form an intoxicating yet deeply sad mix Here again we can notice the parallels between medieval poetry of Chaucerian English and the personal lyric poetry of the Persians.ImageryMedieval Persian poetry trades in a number of stock images such as the moon as the perfect lover s cheeks the rose as the lover s face the hyacinth the curling locks the cypress the graceful form Leading to dual images of the nightingale helplessly enad of the rose the morning breeze as the messenger of love the scent of musk the beloved s smell of tresses the beloved as seller of sweetmeats and the lover poet as an eloquent sweet loving parrot All leading us to the eternal image of the Lover contemplating the Absolute Beauty, of Man gazing at God.This stylized imagery forms the basic stock and trade of all such poets much of the poet s art consists in the ingenious recombination and re application of these traditional stock symbols.And Hafiz s genius is the extraordinary degree to which they become vivid, natural and spectacularly personal in his hands.Such a poet as Hafiz depends on an audience which takes these stock images for granted yet which is sufficiently sophisticated to appreciate the subtleties and ingenuities understanding the poems on several simultaneous levels of significance.Again we are drawn to the comparison of how the same dynamics enliven Chaucer s poetry with the multi fold allegorical interpretation of scripture and other devices.Thus almost any poem of Hafiz can be read on at least three levels of significance though one or the other might be foremost and highlighted As a celebration of wine and love of sensuality in terms of Sufi theology as experiences of the universal mystic beloved transposed as the Divine Sacred and profane love thus intermixing un self consciously as courtly panegyrics lauding his kingly masters as equals to the gods.The following are a few pointers that are not applicable to Hafiz alone but for much of oriental poetry I have found it important to keep such distinctions in mind to understand poetry that at first glance seems outlandishly far away While much of this comes from the translator s notes, it might be useful advice for reading other beautiful works too.Add to all this the consideration that these were meant to be sung and not to be read and were composed mostly impromptu on the urging of an unforgiving patron and we can begin to see the true genius of the poetry.StructureHafiz s poetry and in fact much of oriental poetry seems disconnected to the modern ear drawing criticism such as being oriental pearls strung on a random sting but this is because they were not influenced by the beginning middle end Aristotelean conception of structuring The unity in such poetry emerges from a symbolic unity of the leading imagery of each Ghazal couplet each linked to the others only through imagery but not through ideas deliberately suppressed for effect, sometimes even forming multiple interlinkages skipping couplets to form multiple threads to form a delicious arabesque imagery through the poetry it is hard to conceive of In addition, the whole composition being circular rather than linear allows the couplets to eventually lead you back to where you began from similar to much of the Persian miniature painting principles As if a necklace of images has at long last been clasped completed.ExcerptsNow for a few excerpts Boy, bring the cup And circulate the wine How easy at first love seemed but now the snags begin.Except for this one fault I can find no fault in your beauty That your face reveals no trace of truth or of love Tears, tears like pearls must thread your eyelashes,Before you drink the wine from the eternal jeweled cup None shall, as Hafiz does, withdraw Thought s veil,Who has not combed out language, like a bride Love knows no difference between monastery and drinking booth,For the light of the Friend s face irradiates all. Come let us get drunk, even if it is our ruin For sometimes under ruins one finds the treasure A laughing wine cup, a tangle of knotted hair And let good resolutions, like those of hafiz be shattered If you sit above my grave with music and wineAt the fragrance of you I shall rise from that narrow place and dance We are not bigots nor puritans we need no penance Preach to us only with a cup of unmixed wine This worship of wine, Hafiz, is a virtuous business,So be resolute in performance of Righteous works


  10. says:

    Divan Of Hafez, H fez, 1384 975 9789645959775 9645959772 14 17 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11


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