➫ [Ebook] ➦ Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit By Eliese Colette Goldbach ➶ – Transportjobsite.co.uk

Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit pdf Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit, ebook Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit, epub Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit, doc Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit, e-pub Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit, Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit 250dd9c0d70 Elements Of Tara Westover S Educated The Mill Comes To Represent Something Holy To Eliese Because It Is Made Not Of Steel But Of People New York Times Book ReviewOne Woman S Story Of Working In The Backbreaking Steel Industry To Rebuild Her Life But What She Uncovers In The Mill Is Much Than Molten Metal And Grueling Working Conditions Under The Mill S Orange Flame She Finds Hope For The Unity Of America Steel Is The Only Thing That Shines In The Belly Of The MillTo ArcelorMittal Steel Eliese Is Known As Utility Worker, But This Was Never Her Dream Fresh Out Of College, Eager To Leave Behind Her Conservative Hometown And Come To Terms With Her Christian Roots, Eliese Found Herself Applying For A Job At The Local Steel Mill The Mill Is Everything She Was Trying To Escape, But It S Also Her Only Shot At Financial Security In An Economically Devastated And Forgotten Part Of America In Rust, Eliese Brings The Reader Inside The Belly Of The Mill And The Middle American Upbringing That Brought Her There In The First Place She Takes A Long And Intimate Look At Her Rust Belt Childhood And Struggles To Reconcile Her Desire To Leave Without Turning Her Back On The People She S Come To Love The People She Sees As The Unsung Backbone Of Our Nation Faced With The Financial Promise Of A Steelworker S Paycheck, And The Very Real Danger Of Working In An Environment Where A Steel Coil Could Crush You At Any Moment Or A Vat Of Molten Iron Could Explode Because Of A Single Drop Of Water, Eliese Finds Unexpected Warmth And Camaraderie Among The Gruff Men She Labors Beside Each DayAppealing To Readers Of Hillbilly Elegy And Educated, Rust Is A Story Of The Humanity Eliese Discovers In The Most Unlikely And Hellish Of Places, And The Hope That Therefore Begins To Grow


10 thoughts on “Rust: A Memoir of Steel and Grit

  1. says:

    Eliese Goldbach pulls back the curtain to reveal the unseen struggles and contributions to society by steelworkers in Cleveland, Ohio, her hometown Along the way, she delves into complex issues of mental health, politics, socioeconomic status, gender equality, and religion in her own life It is, ultimately, a memoir about hope, but there was great suffering on Goldbach s path to this realization.When Goldbach was young, she viewed the stink of the steel mills as a type of pollution she needed Eliese Goldbach pulls back the curtain to reveal the unseen struggles and contributions to society by steelworkers in Cleveland, Ohio, her hometown Along the way, she delves into complex issues of mental health, politics, socioeconomic status, gender equality, and religion in her own life It is, ultimately, a memoir about hope, but there was great suffering on Goldbach s path to this realization.When Goldbach was young, she viewed the stink of the steel mills as a type of pollution she needed to keep out of her body But, when her plans to become a nun don t materialize and she faces hurdles to completing the paperwork for her masters degree, Goldbach applies at the steel mill for the paycheck, accepting it as a step backwards in order to move forward into self sufficiencyIn a Rust Belt town, that flame isn t just a harbinger of weird smells and pollution It isn t an anachronism, and it doesn t prove a lack of innovation The flame is very much a part of our history and our identity It s a steady reminder that some things can stand the test of time, even in a world where nothing is built to last A large part of Goldbach s failure to thrive is caused by her mental health struggles It affects her ability to hold down a full time job, maintain her relationships, and makes her dread the future Yes, she might be doing well now, she tells herself, but in another couple of weeks that might not be true any longerDoctors would tell me that mixed state bipolar disorder is one of the most dangerous forms of the disease Depression brings suicidal thoughts, and mania adds impulsivity When people with mixed state bipolar disorder have the will for death, they arelikely to have the energy to follow through Raised in a conservative and religious household, Goldbach is trained from an early age to see feminism as a dirty word Through her own life experience, she discovers that some of her assumptions about feminism are untrue and begins to speak up for those who are unable or unwilling to speak for themselvesWhile there were other women who worked in the mill, we were definitely a minority There was a good deal of mansplaining, and there were offhanded comments that came straight out of the 1950s Goldbach s memoir shines in its examination and dissection of her personal beliefs and how those change through experience It feeds into my own belief that only the person living a life has the true insight into its meaning and directionI m just disappointed in myself, I guess I feel like I should have doneby now, and I m worried that I ll get stuck in the mill Some readers may find Goldbach s politics off putting But I think the difficult conversations she describes at the dinner table with her parents are going on at other dinner tables all across the country An open dialogue and willingness to look at our differences can be painful, but that doesn t mean we should never have those conversations.Recommended for readers who enjoy memoirs and as a possible book club pick Trigger warnings for mental health issues, especially those with bipolar disorder, and rape.Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for a free digital copy of this book The brief quotations cited in this review may change or be omitted in the final print version


  2. says:

    Eliese leaves no stone unturned whether it s baring her struggles with bi polar disorder or sharing snapshots of her life s work in the local steel mill The life of a steelworker is a dangerous one, exposing workers to almost inhumane conditions and where the smallest deviation could cause maiming or death The mill was pretty much the only game in town though and high pay was a major incentive for the workers to provide better care for their families Eliese shares her very personal and eye op Eliese leaves no stone unturned whether it s baring her struggles with bi polar disorder or sharing snapshots of her life s work in the local steel mill The life of a steelworker is a dangerous one, exposing workers to almost inhumane conditions and where the smallest deviation could cause maiming or death The mill was pretty much the only game in town though and high pay was a major incentive for the workers to provide better care for their families Eliese shares her very personal and eye opening account of life and struggles in the rust belt I was impressed by her determination and grit I was not a fan of inserting her political opinions


  3. says:

    This was a really fascinating and compellingly written memoir looking at the author s experience working in the Rust Belt in a steel mill, particularly so because of the connections she draws to how she ended up there based on current politics, her education, religious upbringing, class, mental health, and the complexities of a recession Her commentary and self awareness of privilege, juxtaposed against her experience with mental health and sexual assault related trauma particularly, was really This was a really fascinating and compellingly written memoir looking at the author s experience working in the Rust Belt in a steel mill, particularly so because of the connections she draws to how she ended up there based on current politics, her education, religious upbringing, class, mental health, and the complexities of a recession Her commentary and self awareness of privilege, juxtaposed against her experience with mental health and sexual assault related trauma particularly, was really well developed alongside the everyday issues she encountered as a woman working in a male dominated workplace.What I felt was missing was perhaps another chapter or so from Goldbach reflecting on her transition into academia, and how her time in the steel mill informed and impacted that I found that quite compartmentalized, which seemed at odds when compared with how much earlier parts of her life influenced her time at the steel mill.I would have also been fascinated to see photographs of some of thetechnical aspects of her work in the mill perhapswishful thinking on my part as I found these descriptions so fascinating I would have loved to have seen the scale of some of the work tasks she performed, for example.Many thanks to Flatiron for a review copy


  4. says:

    Lovely book Yes it s about a steel mill, but it was a book that made you go AWWWWW So, yes lovely book Very interesting Thanks to author,publisher and Netgalley for the chance to read this book While I got the book for free,it had no bearing on the rating I gave it.


  5. says:

    I enjoyed reading this book so much, and I know that it s going to be up for a reread soon This book shows how Eliese is just so strong and even though she goes through her bipolar disease flare ups and trauma, working in the steel factory and struggling with her personal life, she stays strong and she stands up for what is right This is the first memoir I have ever read, and I m so glad I started with this one because it will stay with me for a long time.


  6. says:

    Overall this was an interesting memoir, well written with a good dose of humor to offset some of the heavier content Eliese Goldbach, a promising student finds herself adrift after completing her schooling At 26 she s just getting by painting houses, when her friend suggests she apply for a job at the steel mill a place that has loomed large over her entire childhood Soon the mill all it s many workers start to fill a void in her life The inner workings of the mill were both fascinating a Overall this was an interesting memoir, well written with a good dose of humor to offset some of the heavier content Eliese Goldbach, a promising student finds herself adrift after completing her schooling At 26 she s just getting by painting houses, when her friend suggests she apply for a job at the steel mill a place that has loomed large over her entire childhood Soon the mill all it s many workers start to fill a void in her life The inner workings of the mill were both fascinating and overwhelming This is a nice addition to the wealth of memoirs that focus on Appalachia and other regional stories It s also a look at the Midwest steel workers mentality Roundup 3.5 starsThank you to NetGalley and publisher for providing me with an ARC for review


  7. says:

    First of all this is NOT a book just about steel mills It is as if she started to write a book about steel mills but then digressed and decided to make it about her personal life and her political views, and is not a book I recommend or will reread although I LOVED the narrator It will certainly help you see life through her eyesGood points1 she points out how women are still mistreated in 2010 2017 time frame 2 she exemplifies a good work ethic and shows courage and determination in her First of all this is NOT a book just about steel mills It is as if she started to write a book about steel mills but then digressed and decided to make it about her personal life and her political views, and is not a book I recommend or will reread although I LOVED the narrator It will certainly help you see life through her eyesGood points1 she points out how women are still mistreated in 2010 2017 time frame 2 she exemplifies a good work ethic and shows courage and determination in her professional life BAD POINTS 1 she foolishly indulges in alcohol and drugs and smokes cigarettes ,2 She explicitly vividly describes how she was promiscuous sexually molested as a school girl DURING CLASS by a fellow student WHEN THE TEACHER WAS IN THE ROOM yes girls should slap a boy in the face who is feeling her in class AND TELL THE TEACHER 3 She had a big ego she her self said I did not want to become a nun out of a sense of duty to the world but so people would see me as a god which is the exact WRONG reason She says I did not want to be just an ordinary common person but something much greater and far above common boring people I have no problem with that but once should not want others to know about ones spiritual progress in fact one should hide it as one should hide ones charity 4 She labels people as Republican or Democrats People are all Gods children and are in fact all ONE being.It, again , is ego that separates them into warring fractionsI kept telling myself as I read There but by the grace of God go I because as a teenager i shared certain traits with the author such as cruel impulses to kill deer with my bare hands which made me wonder whether I was controlled by the devil but then by God s grace I saw the light and how my life is one with all and how all life is one life and that ego is an illusion so whatever I do to others considering them separate from me I do to myself as so its its injurious I injure myself and can not escape the pain of course my mind was not clouded by alcohol so I could assimilate this view into my life but even that was the grace of God If god had not intervened in my life I could have turned out just like this author Thai book is like looking at where id be without his grace.As I said I liked her strong work ethic , courage , ability to take hazing and dont give up attitude but her ability to passively take crap from others was a negative when it cam to letting teh boy do what he did to her in class Her problem was she could not discriminate between when to allow others to be unfair to her so as not to create a scene and when to create a scene Alcohol certainly clouded her scene of discrimination plus we are all struggling souls and we all have our own crosses to bear No one is perfect and God does help every single one of us Her moment came when she was about to drown herself after her boyfriend up broke up with her during and due to her bipolar episode a very dark moment in her if but is also when teh light dawned as suddenly she could look down upon herself from outside This is a moment of Gods grace , divine intervention I can only hope she continues to improve her conscious contact with God which will only be in proportion to a reduction in ego I was once told that E.G.O stands for Edging God Out However Although she clearly had a moment in the story where God prevented her from having a suicide She does not mention that having a relationship with God was a major part of her life after that Most of her references to prayer we strongly mired in her catholic background as if a residual from her childhood a childish thing she does not seem to have actively sought to improve her conscious contact with God via daily meditation Your God is what you turn to in times of need She seems to have turned to alcohol drugs and human companionship even when she went to a catholic college Moral Drugs and God dont mix.She needs to give them up to go forward and go towards God It is mind blowing that the priest she confessed to after her rape did not tell her this and include it in her penance We should write books to share helpful things with our readers I felt her explicit narrative of how she was felt up by a boy during class was not helpful but perverting She did not need to go into it in such fiendish detail I did skip this part which went on for several minutes but I could tell she was going through it in great detail It is not enough to be honest once should also use discretion when sharing events from our lives.Again with her rape she could have just said They sneaked me a drug in my drink and raped me But she had to go into explicit detail leaving nothing out The only one who would enjoy reading this would be a pervert or a rapist which I m not so I did not enjoy it and I did not enjoy how she explicitly she wrote about her impulse to kill that deer I prefer to read acts of compassion and nobility.I would venture to say that she does not know how to keep her focus positive and lest her energy drift to negative focuses She may say well that s my Bipolar but I say If you dont control you focus who will That s why I read authors who control the focus of their writing keeping it positive and not plunging deeply into negative states taking their readers with them Again truthfulness is not enough truth must be combined with discretion so it does not hurt others Wisdom is also required I also dont understand how any one in how any one can make a conscious decision to smoke in 2010 when all the harmful effects are known Drinking and drugging did not help her bipolar Again one should hold to wisdom and be guided by it One thing I learned from this book is how some people just cant see it.Mirdad says Wisdom is a burden to the half wise as is folly to the fool Assist the half wise with his burden and let the fool alone the half wise can teach himthat you can So ther are some pleope who I can not help Midad also says Dark passions breed and prosper in the dark Allow them the freedom of light if you would decrease their brood so YES one should talk to others about these guilt laden negative events or experiences or deeds to those who care about them and are one their side but not publish them in books for the general public This book may be helpful if you have a loved one who has bipolar or are considering becoming a steel worker and it is well written and I loved the narrator if the narrator had not been so good I would definitely not been able to enjoy the book I did like the character who had model cars and liked to work on engines forgot his name Bottom Line if this author is to move forward she needs to take possibility for what she chooses to focus on for which she will probably have to give up alcohol and take up some form of mental discipline for mind control to go i deeper into her conscious and seek god her conscience there and not us bipolar as an excuse to go astray


  8. says:

    Time taken to read 1.5 daysPages 308Publisher QuercusSource Review copyBlurb from Goodreads One woman s story of working in the backbreaking steel industry to rebuild her life but what she uncovers in the mill is muchthan molten metal and grueling working conditions Under the mill s orange flame she finds hope for the unity of America.Steel is the only thing that shines in the belly of the millTo ArcelorMittal Steel Eliese is known as 6691 Utility Worker, but this was never h Time taken to read 1.5 daysPages 308Publisher QuercusSource Review copyBlurb from Goodreads One woman s story of working in the backbreaking steel industry to rebuild her life but what she uncovers in the mill is muchthan molten metal and grueling working conditions Under the mill s orange flame she finds hope for the unity of America.Steel is the only thing that shines in the belly of the millTo ArcelorMittal Steel Eliese is known as 6691 Utility Worker, but this was never her dream Fresh out of college, eager to leave behind her conservative hometown and come to terms with her Christian roots, Eliese found herself applying for a job at the local steel mill The mill is everything she was trying to escape, but it s also her only shot at financial security in an economically devastated and forgotten part of America.In Rust, Eliese brings the reader inside the belly of the mill and the middle American upbringing that brought her there in the first place She takes a long and intimate look at her Rust Belt childhood and struggles to reconcile her desire to leave without turning her back on the people she s come to love The people she sees as the unsung backbone of our nation.Faced with the financial promise of a steelworker s paycheck, and the very real danger of working in an environment where a steel coil could crush you at any moment or a vat of molten iron could explode because of a single drop of water, Eliese finds unexpected warmth and camaraderie among the gruff men she labors beside each day.Appealing to readers of Hillbilly Elegy and Educated, Rust is a story of the humanity Eliese discovers in the most unlikely and hellish of places, and the hope that therefore begins to grow.My Review i don t know why but I thought this was going to be quite heavy on emotional angst side, it wasn t that at all Eliese had set ideas on the steel mills growing up as well as religion and politics As Eliese becomes an adult and things happen in her life she finds herself not only questions but 360 on quite a lot of the ideas she had growing up Rust takes us into the steel mills, what it is like to work in a perilous environment, where one mistake can literally be death to you or a co worker The hazards, the problems being a woman in this environment, the difference between being a new start and becoming an established part of the team with union cover and job protection The stories of folk who have died in the company, the very real hazards, even in the departments most sought after Eliese takes us on the journey of her life, through this very male dominated work force, money at the top and how current politics affects the job.Aside from this, we have to remember this is a true story memoir and we get the rest of Eliese s lie experiences A very honest and brutal look at mental health, how it affected her day to day life, relationships, good days and bad and a sexual attack and the impact that had on her and her views.I am not a fan of politics but it was interesting to see how Goldbach examined hers and challenged her family, over dinner as you imagine with the current political issues this is happening across the globe, in many variations.The book does jump around a wee bit, in time, from the job and heading back to growing up, ideas formed, back to current day work back to college and what happened there Her mental health is discussed sporadically throughout the book When it comes up it does go into very vivid details cataloguing some of the episodes she survived or getting through that particular day Then we go back to the steel mill and what was happening in that recounting I really enjoyed the steel mill stuff as it isn t something I have ever thought about or read so I found it fascinating, the jumps may be a bit distracting to some readers but once she got into her stride, be it the mental health encounters or the mill I found it pretty fascinating and didn t want to stop reading 4 5 for me this time, I think I would like to readon the mills and prior to this book I doubt that is a sentence I would have thought let alone said A raw and brave look into a woman s life who has battled so much and came out fighting at the other end


  9. says:

    I listened to this on audio and found it to be interesting and emotionally compelling The author shares her personal experiences that mirror the experiences of many young women, particularly as relates to mental illness, being a female in a male dominated environment, and trying to determine what success looks like in this modern world Definitely worth your time.


  10. says:

    As I read this book, I had to keep reminding myself that it is a memoir, not fiction that every word is true How could a young woman, derailed by the onset of bipolar illness, willingly suffer the rigors of working in a steel mill in a city she wanted nothingthan to escape Rather than give way to self pity and shattered dreams, Goldbach gamely takes on the scorching heat, physical hazards, and occasionally obstructive coworkers that come with employment in what many of us thought was a As I read this book, I had to keep reminding myself that it is a memoir, not fiction that every word is true How could a young woman, derailed by the onset of bipolar illness, willingly suffer the rigors of working in a steel mill in a city she wanted nothingthan to escape Rather than give way to self pity and shattered dreams, Goldbach gamely takes on the scorching heat, physical hazards, and occasionally obstructive coworkers that come with employment in what many of us thought was a dead American industry In fact, when I first started reading, I was surprised to realize the book takes place very recently, not decades ago A window on an unappreciated and often misunderstood contingent of American workers, Goldbach s story is told with candor and compassion like any good memoir it reads like a novel With grace and wit, the author takes us on a tour not only of the mill, but of her personal life, adroitly shifting back and forth between the two and weaving in pertinent and compelling episodes from her past.Be sure to preorder today


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