❴EPUB❵ ✻ How It Is Author Samuel Beckett – Transportjobsite.co.uk


How It Is explained How It Is, review How It Is, trailer How It Is, box office How It Is, analysis How It Is, How It Is ae76 Best Book, How It Is Author Samuel Beckett This Is Very Good And Becomes The Main Topic To Read, The Readers Are Very Takjup And Always Take Inspiration From The Contents Of The Book How It Is, Essay By Samuel Beckett Is Now On Our Website And You Can Download It By Register What Are You Waiting For Please Read And Make A Refission For You

  • Paperback
  • 111 pages
  • How It Is
  • Samuel Beckett
  • English
  • 10 October 2019
  • 0802150667

About the Author: Samuel Beckett

Samuel Barclay Beckett was an Irish avant garde novelist, playwright, theatre director, and poet, who lived in France for most of his adult life He wrote in both English and French His work offers a bleak, tragicomic outlook on human nature, often coupled with black comedy and gallows humour.Beckett is widely regarded as among the most influential writers of the 20th century Strongly influenced by James Joyce, he is considered one of the last modernists As an inspiration to many later writers, he is also sometimes considered one of the first postmodernists He is one of the key writers in what Martin Esslin called the Theatre of the Absurd His work became increasingly minimalist in his later career.Beckett was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Literature for his writing, which in new forms for the novel and drama in the destitution of modern man acquires its elevation He was elected Saoi of Aosd na in 1984.



10 thoughts on “How It Is

  1. says:

    Based on all the 5 reviews Im going to say this is a case of its me not you but I really did not enjoy this one Based on all the 5 reviews I m going to say this is a case of its me not you but I really did not enjoy this one

  2. says:

    Novels narrated by various tersely named men real or imagined crawling through the mud of their memories and literal mud perhaps tend to lapse into screaming clich This is one of the better efforts.

  3. says:

    How it is Dear God How it will be A few years ago I was outside, walking along, and a large black and white bird of a type I had never seen before fell out of a tree and onto the pavement Straight down No flutter of wings No noise, except the dull thud of its body hitting the concrete It was unhurt, however I raised my eyebrows, and carried on walking Coming towards me was a young woman with a pushchair The pushchair was empty as the child was by her side As they passed me they How it is Dear God How it will be A few years ago I was outside, walking along, and a large black and white bird of a type I had never seen before fell out of a tree and onto the pavement Straight down No flutter of wings No noise, except the dull thud of its body hitting the concrete It was unhurt, however I raised my eyebrows, and carried on walking Coming towards me was a young woman with a pushchair The pushchair was empty as the child was by her side As they passed me they noticed the bird Poor thing I turned around They had stopped, and, fearing for the bird s safety, were trying to usher it off the pavement, and onto some grass Arms outstretched Both mother and child Chik Tsk Here No There Unfortunately, the bird did not understand It ran away from the outstretched arms, the welcoming, protective embrace And into the road And under the wheels of a slow moving car Crunch I d never heard anything like it Drawn out Cruuuuuunnnnnch How it is How it will be Dear God.Whenever I think of this incident, which I do quite frequently, I m always put in mind of Samuel Beckett I imagine he would have got a kick out of it, what with the bird being essentially herded towards death It s funny And sad too Too sad Towards the end of his career Beckett wrote a series of short, experimental prose pieces, all of which are about the absurdity of the human predicament Life, old age, death How it was How it is How it will be All of them are funny And sad too Too sad Of those novels I feel a strong affection for the beautiful Ill Seen Ill Said and Worstward Ho But I m not reviewing those His trilogy which includes Molloy, Malone Dies and The Unnamable is the most acclaimed, the most read, it seems Which is perhaps a lie For I have been given the impression that The Unnamable is enduredthan read I have, in fact, seen it called The Unreadable As a joke Being a contrary arse I ve read the unreadable twice It is my favourite of the trilogy.How it is, which was published in English in 1964, is often regarded as a kind of companion piece to The Unnamable Yet I would wager that this hasto do with difficulty than anything else, with how many people struggle to understand or complete both books You can tell how baffling a book is when you can find nary a single in depth review of it anywhere on the internet, and that is the case with How It Is I searched for almost an hour last night and managed to turn up little of any note Am I going to be the first to give this book a thorough going over Well, I am not one to shy away from a challenge I will go on I must go on, and on, and on So on The narrator is lying in the mud, murmuring to the mud his life before Pim, with Pim and after Pim He appears to be almost completely physically incapacitated, being able to move only by crawling, by pulling himself along, in the mud His possessions are a sack, a tin opener, and some tins of food It is a typically bizarre Beckettian situation find someone at last someone find you at last live together glued together love each other a little without being loved be loved a little without loving answer that leave it vague leave it dark This mud man scenario could be interpreted as a comment on the nature of human destiny, in that we, in a sense, crawled out of the primeval mud, and will one day return to it Literally, for in death we eventually become of the earth, of the soil we become, in the end, as formless as the mud itself Further, the struggle through the mud is, you might say, comparable to man s struggle, i.e that life involves dragging oneself through the dirt, looking for other people, finding them, losing them, eating, shitting, vomiting How it is How life is And there is another kind of struggle, the struggle to give form, or meaning, to one s existence, in among all that dirt, and the shitting and the vomiting Who are you What are you doing What have you done What will you do Before Now After An attempt to give structure to something life that is inherently without structure We all do this We divide our time on earth arbitrarily days, weeks, months, years, hours, etc and we define our lives and ourselves by arbitrary events, like meeting Pim There is certainly something in all this.If one accepts any of what I have been discussing, the style which I imagine plays a major part in frustrating readers is appropriate The novel is presented as a series of very short paragraphs There is no capitalisation, and no punctuation Therefore, the book could be said to crawl into being, rather than confidently announce itself Or perhaps one might argue that it has no real beginning, creating the impression that the man has always been there, in the mud And what is a beginning It is an arbitrary moment it is a product of our desire to impose structure, or form, and meaning upon things Ah Despite the man s efforts, How it Is has no structure or form it is plotless Moreover, his thoughts are often or almost entirely incoherent, they are muddled, they too are formless, like the mud.I m not, of course, positioning myself as an authority on the novel, for there were certainly aspects of it that passed me by not least Beckett s own explanation, which makes precious little sense to me for example, I can t satisfactorily explain, and feel no real desire to attempt to satisfactorily explain, what is going on with the man and the voice, i.e what he means when he says I say it as I hear it as though there is a kind of distance or disconnect between the two I s, the mental and physical Further, this is the one Beckett novel that, as far as I can remember, includes so many references or allusions to religion, and I m on shaky ground there too But I ll go on, I must go on, in any case Virgil, Dante, and Belacqua I may be reaching somewhat but I can t help but think the key to some of that is to be found in the sole reference to Belacqua Beckett was, by all accounts, a big fan of Dante Alighieri s The Divine Comedy, a poem in three parts three parts Before Pim etc Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso He was, over, especially interested in the minor character Belacqua, frequently featuring him in his work, including the More Pricks Less Kicks collection Dante and Virgil come upon him in Purgatorio, sitting in a fetal position he is said to be the epitome of indolence or laziness While you wouldn t call it indolence, the man in How It Is is not, as noted, the most active There is that But the real point of interest, for me, is in which volume this character appears Purgatory The intermediate state, or place, between heaven and hell Perhaps this is is where the mud man finds himself Having said that, you could equally or evenpersuasively make a case for him being in the Inferno, in a Dantesque circle of Hell, forced to live in mud as a punishment for past wrongs Indeed, in the third circle of Hell Canto IV , a slush falls from the sky and collects on the ground, creating a kind of muddy swamp, in which naked shades howl and roll around What maybe gives this theory a little extra weight is that the man does speak or murmur into the mud about the possibility of going up there, a phrase that would suggest to most people and Beckett must have been aware of this Heaven In truth, I don t believe any of this.As I come to the end of this review I realise that I haven t said anything about how much or how little I enjoyed the book I don t, I must confess, rate it as highly as, for example, the respected American author William Gass, who chose it as one of his 50 Literary Pillars I could name at least five Beckett novels I prefer although being the sixth best Beckett novel is not exactly shameful I did occasionally find it moving, and I would hold up the final two or three pages as being as exhilarating as anything I have read, but How It Is did not always hold my attention there were, as with many genuinely experimental works, moments of tedium, when I was essentially coasting, which means that I was turning pages but not really taking anything in And there were also times when I had to gee myself up, to pick up and plough on But I think that was kind of the point, that the author wanted you to struggle, as his mud man struggles

  4. says:

    The 7th Beckett novel that I ve read and similar to his The Unnamable 3 stars , this has no plot and told in first person narrative Unlike that novel though, this has a structure divided into three parts that feels like past, present and future It s just that the setting is all in mud or murky place where the narrator suffers like in the cell of Malone in Malone Dies 5 stars The narration has no punctuations and it somehow signifies to me the continuity of the suffering like it does not The 7th Beckett novel that I ve read and similar to his The Unnamable 3 stars , this has no plot and told in first person narrative Unlike that novel though, this has a structure divided into three parts that feels like past, present and future It s just that the setting is all in mud or murky place where the narrator suffers like in the cell of Malone in Malone Dies 5 stars The narration has no punctuations and it somehow signifies to me the continuity of the suffering like it does not need to have a period and it is free flowing and unstoppable.Having no plot, this is hard to me to review I do not even know what s the meaning of Pim If it is a person that the narrator meets in Part I and loses in Part II and then in Part III there is no mention of him and the mud but the mood of the narration is still sad, bleak and lonely My take it is that this can be similar to life Part I is when we were single and our life has no clear directions as we just party every night then we meet our spouses Part II is when we try to have our marriage work and it is not easy since life is not easy anyway Part III is when we are already old and have lost our spouses and we are dying so we are excited to reunite with our spouse its just that we are lonely to leave our children, other relatives and friends.But I am just guessing Beckett here, like in his almost all of his novels, tells his story in a poetry like way You have to interpret his phrases to get whatever he wants to convey The good thing is that his lyrical prose in engaging witty form is something to behold You trying reading this short compared to Murphy or Watt novel and you will appreciate how beautiful this work is.Beckett is just uncomparable One of his kind

  5. says:

    The degree zero of literature narrative turned inward, generative and cyclical Wherein character is dissolved into flux and drama is nothingthan its own begetting, the slow translation from west to east , the double movement of self extinguishment and self resuscitation How it has been, how it always will be, how it is.

  6. says:

    Coming out of Goethe into prime mindfuck however superficially Sam is glorious Beckett teaches you how to read anew Of course Goethe s Faust is beyond reproach, but reads like what it very much is a perfect libretto Beckett is a sort of precursor to Plus or Out though I do not know when if I ll be back in Ron s watersnot soon in that the necessary exactness required to appreciate means that you cannot come at it with your own preconceptions Markson, naturally, being the summa the one Coming out of Goethe into prime mindfuck however superficially Sam is glorious Beckett teaches you how to read anew Of course Goethe s Faust is beyond reproach, but reads like what it very much is a perfect libretto Beckett is a sort of precursor to Plus or Out though I do not know when if I ll be back in Ron s waters not soon in that the necessary exactness required to appreciate means that you cannot come at it with your own preconceptions Markson, naturally, being the summa the one writer who has any legitimacy to the claim of advancing the work, in my opinion Beckett s work, that is not all of Fiction If one reads this just bambambam, it will mean next to nothing it ll run the risk of seeming like postmodern rubbish Have you ever played the solitary game of punctuating Beckett in your head It s fun It goes something like this a simple example I know not what insect wound round its treasure I come back with empty hands to me to my place what to begin with ask myself that last a moment with that Beckett which, punctuated, could possibly be I know not what insect wound round its treasure I come back with empty hands to me, to my place What to begin with I ask myself that, last a moment with that Beckett punctuated by me To go for a longer,complex passage what can one say to oneself possibly say at such a time a little pearl of forlorn solace so much the better so much the worse that style only not so cold cheers alas that style only not so warm joy and sorrow those two their sum divided by two and luke like in outer hell Beckett which, punctuated, could possibly be What can one say to oneself Possibly say at such a time a little pearl of forlorn solace so much the better, so much the worse That style, only not so cold Cheer Alas that style, only not so warm Joy and sorrow those two, their sum divided by two, and lukelike in outer hell Beckett punctuated EX I OR..why not this What can one say to oneself Possibly say, At such a time a little pearl of forlorn solace, so much the better so much the worse That style only not so cold Cheers Alas, that style only not so warm Joy and sorrow, those two, their sum divided by two, and luke Like in outer hell Beckett punctuated EX IIWhich is the right one, which the wrong Both and neither That s the beauty of this game Beckett requires you to meet him somewhere approaching equality, and, in doing so, that you bring some of your own kindling to the communal fire But I do offer this That the way it is printed in situ renders it into its own libretto, only one without dictates To attempt an explanation If you sit and listen to a bird singing out of sight, it can just sound like nattering, even annoying, melismatic, reality show scale abusing histrionics All trills and swoops with no seeming point But, and I m sure you ve noticed, certain patterns will reveal themselves if you listen closely micro melodies, twelve tone in their Schoenberg ian democracy a method of composing with twelve tones which are related only with one another , that seem to pop up without meter at first, and then, given a bit of time, are revealed to be bird song that simply doesn t constrain itself to what human convention has ascribed as meter d or rhythmical logic In that arithmetic, time would somehow equal beauty I do not believe that mathematic Regardless, here s the takeaway Samuel Beckett is obviously a bird now living on a telephone pole above my backyard

  7. says:

    One of my favorite books ever It s a poetic, punctuation free, bleak and humorous three part piece about one s past, present, and future selves There s no story per se it slike an existential essay I sped through the book nine years ago, but this past week I read most of it aloud, measuring phrases and writing in the margins There are dead ends, revelations, repetitions, and lucent calculations, all in the name of storytelling about being Beckett composed it in French in 1961 and One of my favorite books ever It s a poetic, punctuation free, bleak and humorous three part piece about one s past, present, and future selves There s no story per se it slike an existential essay I sped through the book nine years ago, but this past week I read most of it aloud, measuring phrases and writing in the margins There are dead ends, revelations, repetitions, and lucent calculations, all in the name of storytelling about being Beckett composed it in French in 1961 and translated it into English in 1964 I imagine the masterful rhythm is similar in both languages I m happy to have found, purchased, and marked up a first edition Grove Press paperback copy, which I ll return to whenever I need to refresh the panting present The lone quote below says how it is before I had mine that vast pit and when I had it at last that vast stretch how it would be then when I had mine at last and when I had it nomine nohow it would be then

  8. says:

    Would you like to destroy your mind Y NYOK, read this book in one sitting.

  9. says:

    Well, now I just don t know what to think Let s see, Beckett was a fan of James Joyce I m guessing he wrote this in admiration of Joyce s skill Perhaps this book isn t the best for starting with Beckett s work Perhaps Joyce is just in a league of his own, causing folks to emulate his style in a myriad of ways Maybe I should readof Beckett and come back to this Maybe a library copy isn t the best way to read this Maybe it should be a slow read My 1st impression was it had a rhythm Well, now I just don t know what to think Let s see, Beckett was a fan of James Joyce I m guessing he wrote this in admiration of Joyce s skill Perhaps this book isn t the best for starting with Beckett s work Perhaps Joyce is just in a league of his own, causing folks to emulate his style in a myriad of ways Maybe I should readof Beckett and come back to this Maybe a library copy isn t the best way to read this Maybe it should be a slow read My 1st impression was it had a rhythm that I enjoyed The paragraphs had a natural silence between them I thought it was reincarnation Then I chased Llamas The rope around our narrator s neck and the sack made me think of the birthing experience But what s the tin There s no tin with reincarnation Pim Bom Confusion sets in and reincarnation is out the metaphorical window So why can t I stop thinking about this book For now, I ll go with a neutral 3 stars cause I just don t know what to think

  10. says:

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Beckett is misunderstood His books are not vague existentialist glosses on the immutable human condition They are journeys HOW IT IS might be the greatest novel I have ever read I say this because the tears sprang out uncontrollably on the third to last page I am thirty eight years old and no book has had this effect on me in at least fifteen years HOW IT IS is the story of a psychoanalysis It is the story of a man discovering that he has a voice It is a metaphorical account of Beckett s Beckett is misunderstood His books are not vague existentialist glosses on the immutable human condition They are journeys HOW IT IS might be the greatest novel I have ever read I say this because the tears sprang out uncontrollably on the third to last page I am thirty eight years old and no book has had this effect on me in at least fifteen years HOW IT IS is the story of a psychoanalysis It is the story of a man discovering that he has a voice It is a metaphorical account of Beckett s escape from schizophrenia In Part One the voice is confused and confusing because the narrator is maximally dissociated Through persistence and permutation the voice that speaks to him this is not clear yet forces the situation to change in an example of Hegelian self determination Pim emeges in Part Two as a necessary response to the breakdown of Part One s autistic solution On to Part Two By torturing Pim, the narrator learns what a voice is He has never heard one before and does not possess one of his own Part Two ends when the narrator and Pim switch places Now he is the one being tortured by Bom The book is organized like a mathematical proof The narrator is attempting every solution, in series, in an attempt to discover what a voice is, where it is located, to whom it belongs The voice moves around outside him, inside Pim but caused by him, inside him but caused by Bom Once he realizes that Bem and Bom are the same, his reasoning takes off We see, in real time, the miracle of intelligence and psychic integration Part Three is exhilarating as the narrator no longer crawls but begins to think His reasoning accelerates as he comes closer to the truth He picks up and abandons a series of partial solutions, eachcomprehensive than the last Finally, at the very end, he realizes the truth The voice is his It has always been his He is dying I still get goosebumps when I think of the cascade of YESES and screams that accompany the narrator s final accession to the truth No other book I know except maybe one of Beckett s other books renders so movingly the will and desire to live than HOW IT IS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *